Arie Luyendyk Jr. insists fame has nothing to do with his The Bachelor appearance, that he definitely wants to go back to his normal life in Scottsdale, AZ, after the show.

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"I came to get engaged. I want to be married. I want to have kids," Arie told People days ahead of The Bachelor's Season 22 premiere on January 1, 2018 at 8PM ET/PT on ABC.

"I want to go back to the life I had six months ago but share that life with someone. I'm not going to go on Dancing with the Stars."

Several The Bachelor couples' relationships have fallen apart after former Bachelors chose to compete on Dancing with the Stars.

Chris Soules' engagement to Whitney Bischoff ended following his stint on Dancing with the Stars' 20th season, for example, while Nick Viall and Vanessa Grimaldi also called it quits on their romance shortly after Season 24 of the reality dancing competition.

Arie's good friend Sean Lowe, who starred on Season 17 of The Bachelor, also previously admitted that the Dancing with the Stars experience strained his relationship with now-wife Catherine Giudici because it was extremely time-consuming and Sean remained in the spotlight and kept receiving all the attention.

Arie will be shown dating 29 accomplished and beautiful bachelorettes when The Bachelor returns next year. It's been six years since Arie attempted to win Emily Maynard's heart on The Bachelorette's eighth edition back in 2012.

Arie told People that he's okay with jokes he's the "old" Bachelor at 36 years old, explained, "I think it's my premature grey, because Nick was older!"

The pro racing driver turned real estate agent said that he's absolutely ready to settle down in his life with a fiancee.

"I'm in a different place in my life than when I was 30: a little bit older and wiser -- and grayer, but it's good," Arie said.

Arie was selected as The Bachelor star although many fans anticipated the leading man would be Peter Kraus, Rachel Lindsay's The Bachelorette 13 runner-up.

"People expected it to be Peter, so there was a negative reaction, but you're always going to have that," Arie told the magazine. "Not everybody is going to be a fan. What was important was that the women were on board."