Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee


Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee Information

Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee is an American web series talk show created, directed and hosted by comedian Jerry Seinfeld, distributed for the first nine seasons by digital network Crackle, then moving to Netflix for season ten (2017). The series premiered on July 19, 2012.

Episodes feature Seinfeld introducing a vintage car selected for a guest comedian, followed by a drive to a pre-selected caf or restaurant for coffee. Episodes diverge from the format spontaneously, as when Michael Richards implores Seinfeld to take a side street, when Seinfeld returns after coffee with Carl Reiner to join him for dinner with Mel Brooks"?or when car trouble arises. As of May 2015, the series had been streamed nearly 100 million times.

The show's ninth season premiered on January 5, 2017. That same month it was announced that the series would migrate from Crackle to Netflix, with the ninth season being the final one to premiere on Crackle. Twenty-four new episodes will stream on Netflix in 2017 and 2018, with all previous episodes made available on the streaming service.

Development and format

Seinfeld has stated that the roots of the concept traced to a DVD extra he made for his 2002 documentary Comedian along with a later trip he made after purchasing an old VW Beetle in New Mexico, subsequently filming the return trip to the east coast with a friend. Later describing the birth of the series Seinfeld said the series birth was "an experiment""?as "kind of a guess."

Prior to development of the series, Seinfeld was told by leading social network advisers, including those at Facebook and Yahoo, that a show length exceeding five minutes had little chance of success on the web. Howard Schultz, coffee magnate and Chairman of Starbucks, turned down the opportunity to sponsor the show. Acura eventually sponsored the show, giving Seinfeld creative license with creating the commercials and product placements.

Episodes are estimated to cost roughly $100,000, with guests being paid in cash and the initial raw shoot lasting on average three-and-a-half hours, which is then edited over a two-week period down to a 12-20 minute episode. The process uses a lean production staff, involves a minimum of network interaction, and is designed as an edited and unscripted talk show without an audience that can be comfortably watched on a smart phone.

Seinfeld intentionally crafted the show's format around the car drive and "movement," specifically because "when attempting to show the meandering, silly and sometimes deep conversations that comedians share, you have to remove the audience to keep the participants from dropping into their acts," adding that "part of what makes the show watchable is that it's always moving. There's no narrative [to] drive the story. We know what happens. We know they're going to get coffee. You need a kinetic energy to move it along, moving people around keeps them awake."

Episodes

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Season 1 (2012)

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Season 2 (2013)

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Season 3 (2014)

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|ShortSummary=Jerry and George Costanza (Jason Alexander, reprising his role from Seinfeld) have coffee and chat about proper etiquette for attending a Super Bowl party before running into Newman (Wayne Knight). The episode was written by Seinfeld and Larry David and directed by David. A 90-second version of the episode aired on Fox before its Super Bowl XLVIII halftime coverage. |LineColor = FFA000 }}

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Season 4 (2014)

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Season 5 (2014)

A serialized yet separated storyline started in this season, featuring Michael Richards as Crackle President Dick Corcoran. Joan Rivers had been asked by Seinfeld to be the fifth season's first guest, however she postponed the appearance due to a scheduled medical procedure. Rivers died as a result of that procedure.

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Season 6 (2015)

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Season 7 (2015-16)

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Season 8 (2016)

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Season 9 (2017)

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Reception

Brian Lowry of Variety said the series is the kind of short-form concept that feels stretched even at 18 minutes. David Hinckley of The New York Daily News gave the series 3 out of 5 stars. Mike Hale of The New York Times said: "The [series' segments]... are presented in a clean, elegant template with a studiously casual pencil-drawn logo. And the filming and editing are, if you break them down, impressively complex and artful for a Web series."

The New York Timess Anand Giridharadas critiqued the show as being out of touch with the everyman, and more of a showcase of Seinfeld's wealth. Giridharadas wrote: "The democracy of observational humor has become, in Mr. Seinfeld's reincarnation, an oligarchy of mutual admiration". Other publications have been more positive in their opinion. The New York Daily News wrote of the show's format and first three seasons that, "It all sounds random, which it is, and trivial, which it is and isn"?t. In the end, the fun is contagious." Newsday then graded season four of the series with an "A".

Awards and nominations

Year Award Category Recipients Result
2013 Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Special Class - Short-Format Nonfiction Program Jerry Seinfeld
2014 Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Short-Format Nonfiction Program Jerry Seinfeld
2015 Producers Guild of America Award Outstanding Digital Series
2016 Producers Guild of America Award Outstanding Digital Series
2016 Primetime Emmy Award Outstanding Variety Talk Series Jerry Seinfeld, Melissa Miller, Tammy Johnston, Denis Jensen, George Shapiro, Howard West

See also

  • Carpool - similar web series hosted by English actor and comedian Robert Llewellyn



This webpage uses material from the Wikipedia article "Comedians_in_Cars_Getting_Coffee" and is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. Reality TV World is not responsible for any errors or omissions the Wikipedia article may contain.
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