NYPD Blue


NYPD Blue Information


NYPD Blue is an American television police drama set in New York City, exploring the internal and external struggles of the fictional 15th precinct of Manhattan. Each episode typically intertwined several plots involving an ensemble cast.

The show was created by Steven Bochco and David Milch and was inspired by Milch's relationship with Bill Clark, a former member of the New York City Police Department who eventually became one of the show's producers. The series was broadcast on the ABC network from its debut on September 21, 1993? and aired its final episode on March 1, 2005. It remains ABC's longest-running primetime one-hour drama series.

In 1997, "True Confessions" (Season 1, Episode 4) was ranked #36 on TV Guide's 100 Greatest Episodes of All Time.

Main cast

Main article: List of NYPD Blue characters


Cast list

Character Rank Duration Portrayed by
Andy Sipowicz Sergeant 1993"2005 Dennis Franz
John Kelly Detective 1993"1994 David Caruso
Bobby Simone Detective 1994"1998, 2004 Jimmy Smits
Danny Sorenson Detective 1998"2001 Rick Schroder
John Clark, Jr. Detective 2001"2005 Mark-Paul Gosselaar
Diane Russell Detective 1995"2003 Kim Delaney
Greg Medavoy Detective 1993"2005 Gordon Clapp
Baldwin Jones Detective 2000"2005 Henry Simmons
John Irvin PAA 1995"2005 Bill Brochtrup
Arthur Fancy Captain 1993"2001 James McDaniel
James Martinez Sergeant 1993"2000 Nicholas Turturro
Sylvia Costas ADA 1993"1999, 2005 Sharon Lawrence
Tony Rodriguez Lieutenant 2001"2004 Esai Morales
Janice Licalsi Detective 1993"1994 Amy Brenneman
Adrienne Lesniak Detective 1994"1996 Justine Miceli
Thomas Bale Lieutenant 2004"2005 Currie Graham
Laura Murphy Detective 2004"2005 Bonnie Somerville
Laura Michaels ADA 1993"1994 Sherry Stringfield
Eddie Gibson Sergeant 1994"2004 John F. O'Donohue
Rita Ortiz Detective 2001"2005 Jacqueline Obradors
Valerie Haywood ADA 2001"2004 Garcelle Beauvais
Connie McDowell Detective 2001"2004 Charlotte Ross
Jill Kirkendall Detective 1996"2000 Andrea Thompson
Donna Abandando PAA 1993"1996 Gail O'Grady
Court Officer Unknown 2003 Charles Martinet

Production and crew

Produced by 20th Century Fox and Steven Bochco Productions, film production primarily took place in the greater Los Angeles area. The show did film in New York but only for exterior shots that used New York landmarks. In the final season the show was filmed only in Los Angeles to save money.

  • Steven Bochco " Executive Producer/Writer
  • David Milch " Executive Producer/Writer
  • Steven DePaul " Supervising Producer/Director
  • Matt Olmstead " Executive Producer/Writer
  • Nicholas Wootton " Executive Producer/Writer
  • Bill Clark " Executive Producer/Writer
  • Mark Tinker " Executive Producer/Director
  • Hans VanDoornewaard " Executive Producer
  • William M. Finkelstein " Executive Producer
  • Gregory Hoblit " Executive Producer/Director
  • Kathy Bates - Director
  • Leonard Gardner " Producer/Writer
  • Mike Post " Music
  • Edward Rogers " Music
The show was initially a vehicle for David Caruso. In a departure from previous Bochco series, John Kelly was the main character and the first season revolved around him and his professional and personal lives (promo shots for the show depicted Caruso in the foreground and other first-season characters set off behind him). Season 2 saw the departure of John Kelly, and with his departure, the decision was made to return to a more ensemble series. Dennis Franz, as Andy Sipowicz, a veteran New York City Police detective, eventually evolved into the show's lead character, taking more and more of a mentorship role as the series progressed (to the point of finally being promoted to sergeant and running the detective squad at the end of the series finale). His principal co-stars included (Season 2 and beyond) Jimmy Smits as Det. Bobby Simone (1994"1998), Rick Schroder as Det. Danny Sorenson (1998"2001) and Mark-Paul Gosselaar as Det. John Clark Jr. (2001"2005). Each was paired with Franz's Sipowicz, providing a younger and more suave foil to the abrasive, tragedy-prone detective.

Plot

Season 1

Main article: NYPD Blue (season 1)
John Kelly and Andy Sipowicz are detectives in the 15th squad. Sipowicz is the elder partner but is a drunk and a threat to the partnership lasting much longer. Kelly has a genuine affection for his partner but becomes increasingly exasperated by Sipowicz's behavior. In the pilot, Sipowicz is shot by a suspect that he had attacked and humiliated earlier. This leads to his decision to sober up and save his job.

While his partner is recuperating, Kelly is teamed up by the squad's Lieutenant, Arthur Fancy, with a young cop from Anti-Crime, James Martinez. Kelly's personal life is no less frenetic as he is going through a divorce from his wife, Laura, and is embarking on an affair with a uniformed cop, Janice Licalsi. To complicate matters further, Licalsi has been ordered to do a 'hit' on Kelly by mob boss Angelo Marino, otherwise Marino would turn in Licalsi's police officer father, who is on his payroll. Instead, Licalsi murders Marino and the repercussions come back to haunt both her and Kelly.

Sipowicz, meanwhile, sobers up and begins a relationship with A.D.A. Sylvia Costas while the other detective in the squad, Greg Medavoy, embarks on an affair of his own with the squad's new P.A.A., Donna Abandando.

Season 2

Main article: NYPD Blue (season 2)
Licalsi is found guilty of the manslaughter of Marino and his driver and is given a two year sentence. Because of his involvement with Licalsi, and the belief that he withheld evidence that could have given her a longer sentence, Kelly is transferred out of the 15th and chooses to leave the department altogether. He is replaced by Bobby Simone, a widower whose previous job was that of driver for the Police Commissioner. This does not sit well with Sipowicz but in time he learns to accept his new partner and, as his relationship with Sylvia leads down the aisle, asks Simone to be his best man.

After an affair with a journalist who uses information that he gives her in an article, Simone begins a relationship with another new officer in the squad, Diane Russell. Sipowicz, still a recovering alcoholic, recognizes in Russell's behavior that she also has a problem and, after much prompting, she herself goes to AA. Elsewhere, due to his lack of self-belief that a woman like Donna could love him, Medavoy's relationship with her breaks down, due in no small part to Donna's visiting sister.

Season 3

Main article: NYPD Blue (season 3)
At the beginning of the season Sylvia becomes pregnant with Andy's child. A baby boy, Theo, is born towards the end of the season. This is contrasted with the fate that awaits Sipowicz's older son, Andy Jr., who announces that he is to join the police force. Andy is finally bonding with his estranged son when he is gunned down, which leads the elder Sipowicz to fall off the wagon. Andy Jr's murderers are killed themselves by Simone in an act of self-defense.

Bobby and Diane, whose relationship had been put on hold while she attended AA, resume their relationship only for Diane to begin drinking again when her abusive father beats her mother. Her father is eventually killed and her mother becomes the prime suspect.

James Martinez and new detective Adrienne Lesniak begin an affair but only after Lesniak tells Medavoy that she is gay, then that she is not; Martinez later breaks up with her due to her controlling and unpleasant behavior, and Lesniak eventually leaves the squad. Medavoy himself leaves his wife, recognizing that she is holding him back but it is too late to save his relationship with Donna who leaves to take up a job with Apple.

Later seasons

During the next two seasons, there are a few minor cast changes: Donna is replaced by several PAA's, most notably by Gina Colon, played by Lourdes Benedicto, a character that eventually marries Martinez and is written out; and Det. Jill Kirkendall, played by Andrea Thompson is partnered up with Russell. Sipowicz's battle with prostate cancer and the up-and-down Simone/Russell relationship, which included Russell's revelation that she had been sexually abused by her father. Also during this time, Franz would win four Emmy Awards, and both Delaney and Clapp would each win an Emmy for supporting roles.

Season 6 becomes a major turning point in the history of the series, as Smits decides not to renew his contract and leaves the show. In episode 5 "Heart and Souls" Simone passes away due to his enlarged heart, shortly after marrying Russell in a civil ceremony, and his body's subsequent rejection of a heart transplant. Smits was replaced by Rick Schroder as Det. Danny Sorenson. Also during Season 6, two other critical incidents occur: the heroin overdose death of PAA Dolores Mayo (played by Lola Glaudini), and the shocking death of Costas, gunned down at the courthouse trial of the suspect accused in Mayo's death by her distraught father. Costas's final words, "Take care of the baby," to Sipowicz leads to his initial withdrawal from the squad. Yet, his keen perceptiveness allows him to gain a confession from the accused suspect, who tried to buy his way out of trouble. Furthermore, Sipowicz reaches a level of understanding with PAA John Irvin (portrayed by Bill Brochtrup), whose homosexuality was a foible for Sipowicz in their interactions to that point.

The next two seasons see the continuation of the Sipowicz/Sorenson relationship, along with more changes in the squad: departing during this time were Kirkendall, Martinez, Fancy as squad leader (through a promotion to write him out), and even Russell herself for a leave of absence to grieve the loss of Simone. Arriving to replace them would be Det. Baldwin Jones, played by Henry Simmons, Det. Connie McDowell played by Charlotte Ross, and Lt. Tony Rodriguez, played by Esai Morales. At the end of Season 8, Sorenson is approached by the owners of a strip club to work for them providing information and such. After reporting this to Lt. Rodriguez, Sorenson goes undercover, but then turns up missing after a stripper he was seeing turns up dead in his apartment (not by his doing as it turns out). The Sorenson character would be written out at the start of Season 9 at the request of Schroder, who wanted to spend more time with his family in Montana.

The fourth and final phase of the show would take place over the final four seasons. In addition to the 'Sorenson missing' storyline, Season 9 would also initially tie-in with the September 11 terrorist attacks. A suspect trades immunity for a robbery and shooting in exchange for information on a buried rug in Brooklyn that turns out to include Sorenson's dead body. Filling the void as partner for Sipowicz is newly promoted Det. John Clark, played by Mark-Paul Gosselaar. As with Simone and Sorenson, there is initial tension between Clark and Sipowicz, largely due to an old feud from years earlier involving Sipowicz and Clark's father, John Clark Sr. (played in guest spots by Joe Spano). Season 9 also sees the introduction of Det. Rita Ortiz played by Jacqueline Obradors.

The remaining four years would see a continuing focus on Sipowicz as the main character, as had been the case since Simone's death. Another unlikely romance would develop between Sipowicz and McDowell. This came about due to her ability to stand up to Sipowicz's gruffness, and her tender relationship with Theo (played by Austin Majors). They would eventually marry, and after adopting McDowell's sister's baby daughter (following the sister's murder by her husband, Connie's brother-in-law), they would have a child of their own as well. The McDowell character would eventually become an off-screen character in the final two seasons, due to issues between Ross and show executives. Other departures and arrivals: Rodriguez would be written out following a dispute with an IAB captain who shot him in a drunken rage; replacing him initially as head of the squad was Sgt. Eddie Gibson, played by former actual NYPD officer John F. O'Donohue, who had previously served in the squad both on night watch and briefly on the "day tour"; Gibson was then replaced at the start of Season 12 by Lt. Thomas Bale, played by Currie Graham; arriving and then departing was ADA Valerie Haywood, played by Garcelle Beauvais-Nilon; and replacing McDowell was Det. Laura Murphy, played by Bonnie Somerville. The final few episodes involve the impending retirement of Det. Medavoy, and Sipowicz's attempts to take the Sergeants exam.

Controversy

The series included greater nudity than was common on broadcast television, which prompted Rev. Donald Wildmon and his American Family Association (AFA) to call it a "soft-core porn" series and take out full page ads in major newspapers, asking viewers to boycott the show. Fifty-seven of ABC's 225 affiliates preempted the first episode, mostly in smaller markets comprising 10"15% of potential viewers. The show's ratings success led most affiliates (and advertisers) to end their opposition. By the end of the first season the show was a Top 20 hit and protests by the AFA were countered by support from Viewers For Quality Television.

In 2005, L. Brent Bozell III told Time that the nudity on the series influenced him to establish the Parents Television Council, in which he served as president from 1995 to 2006. The PTC has directly criticized several episodes of the show for perceived vulgarity and filed complaint with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) over the use of obscene language in several episodes aired in early 2003, at the last half of the tenth season of the show, associating the series with a perceived increase in profanity and violence on prime-time television from the late 1990s to early 2000s. The FCC ruled that the language in the episodes was indecent but decided not to fine ABC because the episodes aired before a 2004 ruling that obscenities would lead to an automatic fine. However, on January 25, 2008, the FCC fined ABC $1.4 million for the episode "Nude Awakening" that aired on February 25, 2003, due to scenes of "adult sexual nudity". The fine was ultimately rejected by the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit on January 6, 2011.

According to NYPD Blue: A Final Tribute, a retrospective broadcast on the same night as the last episode, the controversy was not limited to what was on the screen. David Milch, the show's co-creator and head writer, was a controversial figure on the set during the seven years he was with the show. His working style and tendency to procrastinate or make last-minute, on-set changes contributed to a frustrating working environment for some of the cast and crew. Smits left the show when his contract ended because of it. Milch cites his own alcoholism and other addictions as factors contributing to the difficult environment. In spite of the controversy, Milch is usually credited as a major creative force during the years he worked on the show; Milch won two Emmy Awards for his writing, shared another as executive producer and shared in a further ten nominations for his writing and production.

The final episode

The show's 261st and final episode, "Moving Day", aired on March 1, 2005, bringing an end to the show's 12 year run. The final episode depicted just another day on the job, with Sipowicz as the new squad room leader. In the final scene, previous squad leader Lieutenant Bale wishes Sipowicz good luck with his new position, looks around his old office and says "It's yours." After all the detectives come in, one by one, to wish Sipowicz goodnight, the last to say goodbye is John Clark with "Good night, Boss." Sipowicz surveys his new office, puts his reading glasses on, and begins to go through the paper work on his desk. The camera then moves out through the 15th precinct squad room and out the door. The final shot is the squad room sign over the door.

Awards and nominations

Primetime Emmy Awards

  • 1994 Nomination for Outstanding Drama Series
  • 1994 Nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (David Caruso)
  • 1994 Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 1994 Nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series (Gordon Clapp)
  • 1994 Nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series (Nicholas Turturro)
  • 1994 Nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series (Amy Brenneman)
  • 1994 Nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series (Gail O'Grady)
  • 1994 Nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series (Sharon Lawrence)
  • 1995 Award for Outstanding Drama Series
  • 1995 Nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 1995 Nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Jimmy Smits)
  • 1995 Nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series (Sharon Lawrence)
  • 1995 Nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series (Gail O'Grady)
  • 1996 Nomination for Outstanding Drama Series
  • 1996 Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 1996 Nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Jimmy Smits)
  • 1996 Nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series (James McDaniel)
  • 1996 Nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series (Sharon Lawrence)
  • 1996 Nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series (Gail O'Grady)
  • 1997 Nomination for Outstanding Drama Series
  • 1997 Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 1997 Nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Jimmy Smits)
  • 1997 Nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series (Nicholas Turturro)
  • 1997 Award for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series (Kim Delaney)
  • 1998 Nomination for Outstanding Drama Series
  • 1998 Nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 1998 Nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Jimmy Smits)
  • 1998 Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series (Gordon Clapp)
  • 1998 Nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series (Kim Delaney)
  • 1999 Nomination for Outstanding Drama Series
  • 1999 Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 1999 Nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Jimmy Smits)
  • 1999 Nomination for Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Drama Series (Kim Delaney)
  • 2000 Nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 2001 Nomination for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
Golden Globe Awards

  • 1993 Award for Best Actor in a Drama Series (David Caruso)
  • 1993 Award for Best Drama Series
  • 1993 Nomination for Best Supporting Actor (Dennis Franz)
  • 1994 Award for Best Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 1994 Nomination for Best Drama Series
  • 1995 Award for Best Actor in a Drama Series (Jimmy Smits)
  • 1995 Nomination for Best Drama Series
  • 1996 Nomination for Best Actor in a Drama Series (Jimmy Smits)
  • 1996 Nomination for Best Drama Series
  • 1997 Nomination for Best Actress in a Drama Series (Kim Delaney)
  • 1997 Nomination for Best Drama Series
  • 1998 Nomination for Best Actor in a Drama Series (Jimmy Smits)
  • 1998 Nomination for Best Actress in a Drama Series (Kim Delaney)
Screen Actors Guild Awards

  • 1995 Award for Outstanding Male Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 1995 Award for Outstanding Ensemble in a Drama Series
  • 1996 Nomination for Outstanding Male Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 1996 Nomination for Outstanding Male Actor in a Drama Series (Jimmy Smits)
  • 1996 Nomination for Outstanding Female Actor in a Drama Series (Sharon Lawrence)
  • 1996 Nomination for Outstanding Ensemble in a Drama Series
  • 1997 Award for Outstanding Male Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 1997 Nomination for Outstanding Male Actor in a Drama Series (Jimmy Smits)
  • 1997 Nomination for Outstanding Female Actor in a Drama Series (Kim Delaney)
  • 1997 Nomination for Outstanding Ensemble in a Drama Series
  • 1998 Nomination for Outstanding Male Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 1998 Nomination for Outstanding Male Actor in a Drama Series (Jimmy Smits)
  • 1998 Nomination for Outstanding Female Actor in a Drama Series (Kim Delaney)
  • 1998 Nomination for Outstanding Ensemble in a Drama Series
  • 1999 Nomination for Outstanding Male Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 1999 Nomination for Outstanding Male Actor in a Drama Series (Jimmy Smits)
  • 1999 Nomination for Outstanding Female Actor in a Drama Series (Kim Delaney)
  • 1999 Nomination for Outstanding Ensemble in a Drama Series
  • 2000 Nomination for Outstanding Male Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 2000 Nomination for Outstanding Male Actor in a Drama Series (Rick Schroder)
  • 2000 Nomination for Outstanding Ensemble in a Drama Series
  • 2001 Nomination for Outstanding Male Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 2002 Nomination for Outstanding Male Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
Satellite Awards

  • 1996 Nomination for Best Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 1996 Nomination for Best Actress in a Drama Series (Kim Delaney)
  • 1996 Nomination for Best Drama Series
  • 1996 Nomination for Best Supporting Actress (Gail O'Grady)
  • 1997 Nomination for Best Actor in a Drama Series (Dennis Franz)
  • 1997 Award for Best Actor in a Drama Series (Jimmy Smits)
  • 1997 Nomination for Best Actress in a Drama Series (Kim Delaney)
  • 1997 Award for Best Drama Series
  • 1998 Nomination for Best Actor in a Drama Series (Jimmy Smits)
  • 1998 Nomination for Best Actress in a Drama Series (Sharon Lawrence)
  • 1998 Nomination for Best Drama Series
Television Critics Association Awards

  • 1994 Nomination for Program of the Year
  • 1994 Award for Outstanding Achievement in Drama
  • 1995 Nomination for Outstanding Achievement in Drama
  • 1996 Nomination for Program of the Year
  • 1996 Nomination for Outstanding Achievement in Drama
  • 1997 Nomination for Outstanding Achievement in Drama
  • 1997 Nomination for Individual Achievement in Drama (Dennis Franz)
  • 1998 Nomination for Individual Achievement in Drama (Dennis Franz)
  • 1999 Nomination for Program of the Year
  • 1999 Nomination for Outstanding Achievement in Drama
  • 1999 Nomination for Individual Achievement in Drama (Dennis Franz)
Producers Guild of America Award

  • 1993 Award for Television Producer of the Year
Writers Guild of America Awards

  • 1996 Award for Best Dramatic Episode

Nielsen ratings

Season Premiere Finale Episodes Timeslot Rank Viewers
(in millions)
Season 1 September 21, 1993 May 17, 1994 22 Tuesday 10:00 pm #18 13.0
Season 2 October 11, 1994 May 23, 1995 22 #7 15.7
Season 3 October 24, 1995 May 21, 1996 22 #10 13.5
Season 4 October 15, 1996 May 20, 1997 22 #13 12.1
Season 5 September 9, 1997 May 19, 1998 22 #17 10.5
Season 6 October 20, 1998 May 25, 1999 22 #12 10.4
Season 7 January 11, 2000 May 23, 2000 22 #17 15.5
Season 8 January 9, 2001 May 22, 2001 20 #23 16.2
Season 9 November 6, 2001 May 21, 2002 22 Tuesday 9:00 pm #31 12.3
Season 10 September 24, 2002 May 20, 2003 22 Tuesday 10:00 pm #34 11.3
Season 11 September 23, 2003 May 11, 2004 22 #51 9.9
Season 12 September 21, 2004 March 1, 2005 20 #42 10.1

DVD releases

20th Century Fox Home Entertainment released the first 4 seasons of NYPD Blue on DVD in Region 1, 2 and 4. All of the sets contain the original master recordings, the original ABC broadcasts, and custom-made credits. After the release of the fourth season in 2006, Fox announced that they would be reviewing the possibility of further releases, citing the lack of sales. To date in Regions 1 and 4, there have been no further DVD releases, and it is not known if Fox still retains the rights to the show, as they no longer retains two other Bochco properties, Hill Street Blues and L. A. Law. In Region 2, Mediumrare has since acquired the rights to release the show on DVD in the United Kingdom and seasons five and six became available in December 2012 following on with seaseons seven and eight in February 2013. Mediumrare plans to release the remaining four seasons to DVD between March and April 2013.

DVD Name Ep # Release dates Extra features
Region 1 Region 2* Region 4
The Complete 1st Season22March 18, 2003May 19, 2003June 17, 2003
  • Audio commentary on one episode on each disc
  • "The Making Of Season 1" featurette
  • "Love On NYPD Blue" featurette
  • "Cast Blotter" featurette
  • Script-to-screen comparison
  • Cast/Crew Biographies
The Complete 2nd Season22August 19, 2003October 6, 2003February 17, 2004
  • Audio Commentaries
  • "Season Two: A Season of Change" featurette
  • "Wedding Bell Blues" featurette
  • The Music of Mike Post featurette
  • Script to Screen Comparisons: "Sipowicz Meets Simone", "Sylvia Meets Simone" & "Simone and Sipowicz Bond"
The Complete 3rd Season22February 21, 2006April 17, 2006May 29, 2006
  • Audio Commentary on three episodes
  • Season Three Overview
  • "The 15th Precinct" Featurette
  • "Fathers and Sons" Featurette
  • "Women of NYPD Blue" Featurette
The Complete 4th Season22June 20, 2006August 14, 2006August 21, 2006
  • Audio Commentaries
  • "Through the Lens: The Look of Blue" featurette
  • "In With the New" featurette
The Complete 5th Season22N/ADecember 10, 2012N/A
The Complete 6th Season22N/ADecember 10, 2012N/A
The Complete 7th Season22N/AFebruary 25, 2013N/A
The Complete 8th Season20N/AFebruary 25, 2013N/A
The Complete 9th Season23N/AMarch 25, 2013N/A
The Complete 10th Season22N/AMarch 25, 2013N/A
The Complete 11th Season22N/AApril 29, 2013N/A
The Complete 12th Season20N/AApril 29, 2013N/A
  • Region 2 dates refer to the United Kingdom market.

Episodes

  • Season 1
  • Season 2
  • Season 3
  • Season 4
  • Season 5
  • Season 6
  • Season 7
  • Season 8
  • Season 9
  • Season 10
  • Season 11
  • Season 12

See also

  • Color of the day (police)



This webpage uses material from the Wikipedia article "NYPD_Blue" and is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. Reality TV World is not responsible for any errors or omissions the Wikipedia article may contain.
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