Martha Rofheart


Martha Rofheart Brief Biography

Martha Rofheart (1917 - 1990) was an American writer of historical novels and an actress. She was born Martha Jones May 27, 1917 in Louisville, KY. A model with the Harry Conover agency An actress in the 1940s and 1950s, she made her Broadway debut with Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne in "The Pirate" in 1942. She appeared in Blythe Spirit, Arsenic and Old Lace, The Heiress, The Respectful Prostitute, and other plays, and toured with Katherine Cornell, Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne, and Maurice Evans. In July 1943, she married actor Robert Emhardt with whom she debuted in The Pirate, then appeared in Harriet on Broadway. After her first marriage ended, she remarried in November 1952 to Ralph Rofheart, an art director and advertising executive, by whom she had one child Evan, in 1957. Soon after her son was born, she choose to be a full time mother, and she stopped pursuing acting. In the late 1960s she began working as a freelance advertising copywriter. In the early 1970s, Rofheart wrote a novel of Henry V of England, Fortune Made His Sword, published in the UK as Cry God For Harry. Critic Granville Hicks, reviewing Fortune Made His Sword in The New York Times Book Review, wrote that Rofheart "deftly avoids the dangers" of writing about a subject that's "Shakespeare territory".

After Fortune Made His Sword, Rofheart wrote five novels, Glendower Country, in the UK published as Cry God for Glendower, My Name Is Sappho, a fictionalised theatrical family saga entitled The Savage Brood.The Alexandrian, and Lionheart!: A Novel of Richard I, King of England.

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