Awakenings


Awakenings Information

Awakenings is a 1990 American drama film based on Oliver Sacks's 1973 memoir of the same title. It tells the story of Malcolm Sayer, who, in 1969, discovered beneficial effects of the drug L-Dopa. He administered it to catatonic patients who survived the 1917-28 epidemic of encephalitis lethargica. Leonard Lowe and the rest of the patients were awakened after decades and have to deal with a new life in a new time. The film was nominated for three Academy Awards.

Directed by Penny Marshall, the film was produced by Walter Parkes and Lawrence Lasker, who first encountered Sacks's book as undergraduates at Yale University and optioned it a few years later. Awakenings stars Robert De Niro, Robin Williams, Julie Kavner, Ruth Nelson, John Heard, Penelope Ann Miller, and Max von Sydow. The film features a cameo appearance by jazz musician Dexter Gordon (who died before the film's release) and then-unknowns Bradley Whitford, Peter Stormare, and Vincent Pastore.

Plot

In 1969, Dr. Malcolm Sayer (Robin Williams) is a dedicated and caring physician at a local hospital in the New York City borough of The Bronx. After working extensively with the catatonic patients who survived the 1917-1928 epidemic of encephalitis lethargica, Sayer discovers certain stimuli will reach beyond the patients' respective catatonic states; actions such as catching a ball, hearing familiar music, and experiencing human touch all have unique effects on particular patients and offer a glimpse into their worlds. Leonard Lowe (Robert De Niro) proves elusive in this regard, but Sayer soon discovers that Leonard is able to communicate with him by using a Ouija board.

After attending a lecture at a conference on the subject of the L-Dopa drug and its success with patients suffering from Parkinson's disease, Sayer believes the drug may offer a breakthrough for his own group of patients. A trial run with Leonard yields astounding results: Leonard completely "awakens" from his catatonic state. This success inspires Sayer to ask for funding from donors so that all the catatonic patients can receive the L-Dopa medication and experience "awakenings" back to reality.

Meanwhile, Leonard is adjusting to his new life and becomes romantically interested in Paula (Penelope Ann Miller), the daughter of another hospital patient. Leonard also begins to chafe at the restrictions placed upon him as a patient of the hospital, desiring the freedom to come and go as he pleases. He stirs up a revolt by arguing his case to Sayer and the hospital administration. Sayer notices that as Leonard grows more agitated, a number of facial and body tics are starting to manifest, which Leonard has difficulty controlling.

While Sayer and the hospital staff are thrilled by the success of L-Dopa with this group of patients, they soon find that it is a temporary measure. As the first to "awaken", Leonard is also the first to demonstrate the limited duration of this period of "awakening". Leonard's tics grow more and more prominent and he starts to shuffle more as he walks, and all of the patients are forced to witness what will eventually happen to them. He soon begins to suffer full body spasms and can hardly move. Leonard puts up well with the pain, and asks Sayer to film him, in hopes that he would someday contribute to research that may eventually help others. Leonard acknowledges what is happening to him and has a last lunch with Paula where he tells her he cannot see her anymore. When he is about to leave, Paula dances with him, and for this short period of time his spasms disappear. Leonard and Sayer reconcile their differences, but Leonard returns to his catatonic state soon after. The other patients' fears are similarly realized as each eventually returns to catatonia no matter how much their L-Dopa dosages are increased.

Sayer tells a group of grant donors to the hospital that although the "awakening" did not last, another kind "? one of learning to appreciate and live life "? took place. For example, he himself overcomes his painful shyness and asks Nurse Eleanor Costello (Julie Kavner) to go out for coffee, many months after he had declined a similar proposal from her. The nurses also now treat the catatonic patients with more respect and care, and Paula is shown visiting Leonard. The film ends with Sayer standing over Leonard behind a Ouija board, with his hands on Leonard's hands, which are on the planchette. "Let's begin," Sayer says.

Cast



Production

Principal photography for Awakenings began on October 16, 1989 at the functioning Kingsboro Psychiatric Center in Brooklyn, New York and lasted until February 16, 1990. According to Williams, actual patients were used in the filming of the movie. In addition to Kingsboro, sequences were also filmed at the New York Botanical Garden, Julia Richman High School, the Casa Galicia, and Park Slope, Brooklyn.

Reception

Awakenings opened in limited release on December 22, 1990 with an opening weekend gross of $417,076. The film then expanded to a wide release on January 11, 1991, opening in second place behind Home Alones ninth weekend, with $8,306,532.

Critical response

The film received positive reviews from critics. Review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes reports that 88% of 31 film critics have given the film a positive review, with a rating average of 6.7 out of 10. Metacritic, which assigns a weighted average score out of 100 to reviews from mainstream critics, gives the film a score of 74 based on 18 reviews.

Roger Ebert of the Chicago Sun-Times gave the film a four-out-of-four star rating, writing, </ref>}}

Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly praised the film's performances, citing, </ref>}}

Oliver Sacks, the author of the memoir on which the film is based, "was pleased with a great deal of [the film]," explaining, </ref>}}

Desson Howe of The Washington Post felt the film's tragic aspects did not live up to the strength in its humor, saying that </ref>}}

Similarly, Janet Maslin of The New York Times concluded her review stating, </ref>}}

Accolades

The film was nominated for three Academy Awards, including: the Academy Award for Best Picture, the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay, and the Academy Award for Best Actor (Robert De Niro). Robin Williams was also nominated at the 48th Golden Globe Awards for Best Actor in a Motion Picture Drama.

List of awards and nominations
Award Date of ceremony Category Recipients Result
Academy Awards March 25, 1991 Best Picture Walter F. Parkes,
Lawrence Lasker
Best Actor Robert De Niro
Best Adapted Screenplay Steven Zaillian
Awards of the Japanese Academy March 20, 1992 Best Foreign Film Awakenings
Chicago Film Critics Association Awards 1991 Best Actor Robert De Niro
Golden Globe Awards January 19, 1991 Best Actor - Motion Picture Drama Robin Williams
Grammy Awards February 25, 1992 Best Instrumental Composition Written for a Motion Picture or for Television Randy Newman
National Board of Review Awards March 4, 1991 Best Actor Robert De Niro,
Robin Williams (Tie)
Top Ten Films Awakenings
New York Film Critics Circle Awards January 13, 1991 Best Actor Robert De Niro
Writers Guild of America Award March 20, 1991 Best Adapted Screenplay Steven Zaillian

See also




This webpage uses material from the Wikipedia article "Awakenings" and is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. Reality TV World is not responsible for any errors or omissions the Wikipedia article may contain.
ADVERTISEMENT




POPULAR TV SHOWS (100)



POPULAR PEOPLE (100)


Page generated in 0.27956509590149 seconds