Rapper 21 Savage was granted a $100,000 bond and will be released from immigration detention Wednesday, his attorney said Tuesday.

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Charles Kuck, an attorney for the rapper who was born She'yaa Bin Abraham-Joseph, said U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement opposed his client's release and that his deportation case is pending and may not be resolved for several years, the Atlanta Journal Constitution reported.

"In the last 24 hours, in the wake of the Grammy Awards at which he was scheduled to attend and perform, we received notice that She'yaa was granted an expedited hearing," Kuck wrote in a statement. "Today, 21 Savage was granted a release on bond. He won his freedom."

Abraham-Joseph, was arrested in a "targeted operation" in Atlanta on Feb. 3 after ICE spokesman Bryan Cox said he was an "unlawfully present United Kingdom national" and also a convicted felon.

Cox said Abraham-Joseph overstayed his visa after he entered the United States legally in July 2006.

Kuck said Abraham-Joseph has a visa application from 2017 pending with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, CNN reported.

The application is for a U-visa, which is available to people who have been the victims of a crime in the United States, have suffered physical or mental injury as a result of a crime, and who are helpful to law enforcement or government officials in an investigation or criminal prosecution.

Cox issued a statement responding to a group of protesters calling for Abraham-Joseph's release outside of the immigration court building Tuesday.

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"U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement fully respects the Constitutional rights of all persons to peacefully express their opinion," he said. "That said, ICE remains committed to performing its immigration enforcement mission consistent with federal law and agency policy."