Jordan Fisher


Jordan Fisher Biography


Jordan Fisher had a breakout year in 2016.

In January, Fisher's take as Doody in FOX's Emmy-winning broadcast of "Grease: LIVE" earned him critical acclaim and was deemed the show's breakout star by MTV and People Magazine.

That spring, he released his first single, "All About Us," which was produced by Oak Felder (Alessia Cara, Arianna Grande, Rihanna) and melded influences of pop/soul/R&B. The song was the #2 most added song and a top 30 hit at pop radio. In August, Fisher released his self-titled EP, which debuted #18 on the Billboard Heatseeker album chart.

After performing on The Today Show, the ESPY's Red Carpet Special and opening for Alicia Keys at the Apple Music Festival, Fisher was tagged to perform the end title credit to Disney's hit animated feature film "Moana" with award winning songwriter/producer Lin-Manual Miranda.

Fisher, who has been called out by Miranda as "super-talented," saw a lifelong dream of performing on Broadway come to fruition when he joined the cast of Miranda's uber-hit "Hamilton," where he took on the dual roles of John Laurens and Philip Hamilton.

When ABC was curating the music for "When We Rise," an eight-hour miniseries event with music guiding the four and a half decade storyline, they looked no further than Fisher to cover the 70's classic, "I'd Love to Change the World." The song opened the two-hour premiere, directed by Gus Van Sant.

The underlying thread to all Fisher's success across the board is music. He's not just a multi-talented performer but also a storyteller.

His influences are diverse and can be traced back to his days growing up in a football town outside of Birmingham, Alabama, where he cultivated his tastes by listening to everything from Luther Vandross to Metallica while simultaneous developing his acting skills at the Birmingham-based Red Mountain Theatre Company.

Fisher is readying his debut full-length album. This fall he will release his new single "MESS" with Hollywood Records.



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